How to Repair a Cracked Concrete Driveway

How to Repair a Cracked Concrete Driveway

If your concrete driveway is cracked in several places, you can often repair the edge with a mixture of Quikrete Quick-Setting Cement and Acrylic Fortifier. To repair a cracked edge, simply clean the area and mix the two products. Once mixed, apply the mixture to the crack. If you're not sure what you're doing, it is a good idea to contact a professional concrete contractor.



If your concrete driveway is cracked in several places, you can often repair the edge with a mixture of Quikrete Quick-Setting Cement and Acrylic Fortifier. To repair a cracked edge, simply clean the area and mix the two products. Once mixed, apply the mixture to the crack. If you want to repair the entire concrete driveway corner, use Quikrete Polymer Modified Structural Repair. This repair material also works to reform broken edges.

Repairing a cracking concrete driveway

One of the most common driveway repairs is a crack in the edge. This is usually only a small area and can be repaired with Quikrete Quick-Setting Cement mixed with an Acrylic Fortifier. To repair this edge crack, clean the edge of the driveway thoroughly and then mix the two products. Apply the mixture to the edge. You can also use Quikrete Polymer Modified Structural Repair for larger cracks or entire corners of a concrete driveway. This structural repair material will reform the edge and will prevent the crack from coming back.

To begin the repair, you must clean the area around the crack and blow off any debris that is on the area. To get rid of the dirt, you can use a pressure washer or hose. Alternatively, you can use a hammer and an old screwdriver to chip out the loose material. If you see vegetation, you will need to remove it first. If the growth is regrowing, burn it with a weed burner. Once you've completed the steps above, the driveway should look like new again.

Cost of repair

Depending on the size and extent of the damage, repairing a crack in a concrete driveway can cost anywhere from $0.25 to $2.00 per square foot. The cost of driveway repair varies based on the size and type of concrete and the amount of labor required to complete the repair. To find out the exact cost of repairing a crack, call a contractor or ask for an estimate. Typically, a small crack can be filled with a concrete filler. However, structural cracks may require the driveway to be resurfaced.

If the crack in your concrete driveway is very large, it may be necessary to have it resurfaced. Patching is an excellent temporary solution but is not ideal for a large crack. Water will eventually seep through the old material and open the cracks again. Patching will only fix a small portion of a large crack, and you should evaluate the cost of resurfacing in several years to see whether it is a good option.

Options for repair

While it's possible to repair a crack in your concrete driveway yourself, there are some things you should know about these repairs. Generally, cracks that are wider than a quarter of an inch should be replaced. Those that are wider than one-quarter of an inch may also indicate a larger underlying problem. The cracks may be caused by roots growing under the concrete or by leaky pipes. If this is the case, you'll need to replace your driveway.

Small cracks are often a result of shrinkage as the concrete dries. However, if the cracks are large, it's important to get them repaired immediately. These cracks may appear soon after the concrete has been poured. If left untreated, water may seep into the cracks, freeze and expand, making them much larger and more hazardous. To repair a concrete driveway, it's important to do it when the weather forecast is dry and the concrete surface is fifty degrees F.

Slabjacking as an affordable option

Slabjacking is a relatively inexpensive option to repair cracked concrete. It can be used on a small slab of concrete, but larger areas are more difficult to work with. Costs also depend on the size of the concrete slab, the type of mudjacking technique used, the subsoil conditions, and the extent of concrete damage. Before mudjacking can be done, any drainage issues must be solved. Regardless of the type of mudjacking technique used, you must have a solid foundation to begin with.

Resurfacing is more expensive than slabjacking and can cost anywhere from $3 to $10 per square foot. However, unlike slabjacking, this method does not require drilling holes, which is one of the most labor-intensive steps. It also takes weeks to fully cure new concrete, which may shift if the original problem is not addressed. Slabjacking costs a fraction of the cost of replacement.

Concrete resurfacing as a long-term solution

Resurfacing a concrete driveway is a cost-effective option for many homeowners. Resurfacing involves the removal of old, cracked, or deteriorating concrete and replacing it with new concrete. In addition to cost savings, this process can add a decorative finish to your driveway. And because the entire process is not invasive, it can be performed by most homeowners with little to no experience.

Before resurfacing a concrete driveway, make sure the surface is structurally sound, free of cracks that are more than 1/4 inch deep, and you have completed any necessary surface repairs. To prepare for resurfacing, a thorough cleaning and removal of existing materials will be needed. Then, a 3,500-psi pressure washer will be used to open up the pours in the concrete, allowing the new material to adhere more easily. Lastly, you'll want to maintain any expansion and control joints and ensure that all are secure and tack-down correctly.


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